Tag Archives: Eastern Yellow Robin

Eastern Yellow Robin

A small bird often found in most forested areas of Victoria is the Eastern yellow robin. It is a favourite of mine due to its vibrant colour, its preferred hunting method is to pounce from a low perch and that it is territorial: all very handy habits for a photographer.

Eastern Yellow Robin, Rise and Shine Bushland Reserve, Yandooit, Victoria

Eastern Yellow Robin, Rise and Shine Bushland Reserve, Yandooit, Victoria

Small birds of the far eastern forests.

Mallacoota is surrounded by the Croajingolong National Park wilderness. The dry forests and pockets of rainforest have many species of small birds. It is often a challenge to find them in the heat and humidity of summer but walking quietly in the morning can be rewarding. I am often surprised by their vibrant colours but when facing in a certain direction they can be invisible and difficult to see.

Eastern yellow Robin, Shipwreck Creek, Mallacoota, Vic, 18 Dec 2016

Eastern yellow Robin, Shipwreck Creek

Female Leaden Flycatcher, Shipwreck Creek, Mallacoota, Vic, 18 Dec 2016

Female Leaden Flycatcher, Double Creek

Fan-tailed Cuckoo, Shipwreck Creek, Mallacoota, Vic, 18 Dec 2016

Fan-tailed Cuckoo, Shipwreck Creek trail

Golden Whistler, Shipwreck Creek, Mallacoota, Vic, 18 Dec 2016

Golden Whistler, Mallacoota

Scarlet Honeyeater, Bastian Point, Mallacoota, Vic, 18 Dec 2016

Scarlet Honeyeater, Mallacoota

Lewins Honeyeater, Mallacoota, Vic, 21 Dec 2016

Lewins Honeyeater, Mallacoota

Silvereyes, Mallacoota, Vic, 19 Dec 2016

Silvereyes, Mallacoota

Basian Thrush, Mallacoota, Vic, 19 Dec 2016

Basian Thrush, Mallacoota

More Moorooduc Magic

Moorooduc Quarry is fast becoming one of my favourite places to bird. It is a compact site with a variety of vegetation and landscapes and many bird species.

On the latest visit to check in on the Yellow Robin family I found the Robin now sitting on eggs in the nest.

Brooding Eastern Yellow Robin II, Moorooduc Quarry Flora and Fauna Reserve

Brooding Eastern Yellow Robin.

Brooding Eastern Yellow Robin II, Moorooduc Quarry Flora and Fauna Reserve

Keeping a careful eye on me – I kept my distance

I also found a few regulars and a new one for my site records – a Bassian Thrush – a speckled bird a little larger than a blackbird that loves to forage in the understory of thick cooler forests. While I was trying to photograph the Yellow Robins it popped out to see what the fuss was – posed for a few moments and then dashed back into the thick scrub. I have rarely seen a Bassian Thrush and this is only the second time I have been fast enough to get a photo.

Bassian Thrush, Moorooduc Quarry

Bassian Thrush, Moorooduc Quarry

Bassian Thrush, Moorooduc Quarry

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Grey Butcherbird, Moorooduc Quarry

Grey Butcherbird watching the antics of the Galahs

Galah, Moorooduc Quarry

Female Galah watching the nearby group of male Galahs, Moorooduc Quarry

Galah, Moorooduc Quarry

Male Galah enjoying some dandelion seed heads.

Moorooduc Woodlands Flurry

In a follow-up visit to the Moorooduc Quarry to check on the progress of the little Eastern Yellow Robin nest, I found a completed nest, many other birds and another Drey (they seem to be popping out everywhere now I know they exist). A busy flock of Male Golden Whistlers came through and it soon became a little crazy with birds flying everywhere. The Robins were trying to protect their patch and the male Whistlers seem to be chasing each other. A few Brown Thornbills dropped into the mix as well to check out the fuss.

Eastern Yellow Robin, Moorooduc Quarry

Eastern Yellow Robin in a typical perched hunting pose…ready to pounce on its prey from above.

Eastern Yellow Robin, Moorooduc Quarry

Eastern Yellow Robin II

Eastern Yellow Robin completed Nest, Moorooduc Quarry

The completed nest of our Eastern Yellow Robin, made of paperbark strips and camouflaged with moss and lichen held in place by spider web netting – amazing engineering

Golden Whistler, Moorooduc Quarry

One of the bright male Golden Whistlers that moved through the Robin’s nest area…

Brown Thornbill, Moorooduc Quarry Flora and Fauna Reserve

A curious Brown Thornbill, watching the action

A possum Drey, Moorooduc Quarry

A possum Drey, Moorooduc Quarry

A little cup with loads of Spring hope…

It has been a long cold Winter here in Southern Victoria. Lately the weekends have been good enough to get out,  explore and photograph birds and other wildlife.
Our small crew of intrepid birders decided on a big day of birding down the southern coast, exploring a mix of favourite locations and a few spots that others have not been to before. We started off at Rickett’s Point for Terns and a good start with one of the crew picking up a lifer – a lone tiny Double banded Plover. We stopped briefly at Mordialloc Creek mouth for more tern spotting, and then onto Moorooduc Quarry for Peregrine Falcons, woodland birds and the bonus of a rare and endangered Growling Grass Frog. Tootgarook Swamp was the main target for the day for a general bird survey to help provide evidence to stop yet another real estate development draining the remaining wetlands. We finished with an early evening bushwalk around the Baldry Circuit at Green’s Bush.
There are signs in the bush that the weather will soon be changing. Mates, territories and food sources are being defended and nests are being built. Birds are looking for good locations and appropriate material to build their nests.
At Moorooduc Quarry we came across a pair of Eastern Yellow Robins  building a new nest. It was being made out of paperbark strips for framing and held together with spider-web, packed down and then stuffed with moss and lichen. A lovely piece of engineering. I will have to go back and see the finished product and see how long until the chicks are hatched. They picked a good spot amongst a small dense grove of saplings that would make it difficult to find the nest and hard for larger birds to swoop in and attack the nest.
Eastern Yellow Robin nest

Eastern Yellow Robin nest

Eastern Yellow Robin

Eastern Yellow Robin

Eastern Yellow Robin building a nest

Eastern Yellow Robin building a nest – The robin circled around the rim and using its wings and chest to press the lichen into the top of the rim

Eastern Yellow Robin building a nest

Applying a bit more spider web and using its bill to push in the lichen and moss

Eastern Yellow Robin nest

Eastern Yellow Robin nest – under construction

Eastern Yellow Robin building a nest

Eastern Yellow Robin trying its nest on for size…

Drop Bear and Robin

I recently visited the family farm for a few hours of stacking 2 tonne of firewood with Fanior Ann and Henry Martin. After the job was done and the payment of lunch was settled, I had plenty of time to pass by Moorooduc Quarry to see how the Peregrine Falcons were getting on. I only heard and glimpsed one of the resident falcons but I did have good views of a Wedgetail Eagle drifting over on the afternoon air currents – too far above for any good shots. I found a few of my regular sidekicks as well as an ancient(ish) rock drawing of the legendary and deadly Drop Bear….

Brown Thornbill

Brown Thornbill

White Eared Honeyeater

White Eared Honeyeater

White Eared Honeyeater

White Eared Honeyeater II

Drop Bear

Drop Bear – on the other side of the quarry I noticed an old warning etched into the rocks – everyone has a different opinion on what a drop bear looks like – this is as good as any I have seen.

Eastern Yellow Robin

Eastern Yellow Robin

Eastern Yellow Robin

Eastern Yellow Robin in a typical hunting pose – about to launch down onto the ground after a meal…

Langwarrin Flora and Fauna Reserve – a small bird haven

I explored a new bush park today, on the outskirts of Frankston, Langwarrin Flora and Fauna Reserve. It is a good sized reserve with many well managed and signposted tracks and a wide fire break running down the centre of the park. I spent a few hours investigating several of the Northern  trails and found quite a number of smaller birds. The bush is very thick and dense with the only access via the trails – it is too thick to get into. It is a haven for the smaller birds while the larger birds stick to the taller gums. A few uncommon birds seen were Grey Currawongs, a Collared Sparrowhawk and 2 Wedge Tail Eagles circling very high. Many of the gum trees were flowering and there seemed to be a good supply of Lerp on the leaves as well. The birds were quite aggressive towards other species and each other – a sign of a supply of food worth defending.

Yellow Faced Honeyeater

Yellow Faced Honeyeater

New Holland Honeyeater,

New Holland Honeyeater,

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Little Wattlebird

Little Wattlebird

Grey Shrike Thrush

Grey Shrike Thrush

Collared Sparrowhawk

Collared Sparrowhawk

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And my usual forest companion:

Eastern Yellow Robin

Eastern Yellow Robin

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