Tag Archives: Rainbow Lorikeet

Karbeethong Regulars

One of the areas to explore when staying in Mallacoota is around Karbeethong Ave and Road. It is a small enclave of lovely houses and BnBs. One of the bnbs is Adobe Mudbrick houses. While I have not stayed overnight I often pass through the grounds looking for one of the regulars to be found there – the White-headed Pigeon. I showed a fellow birder who was new to the area where Adobe was and what to expect and while talking to one of the staff about the birdlife, we watched the antics of the local Rainbow Lorikeets. We also found one of the target birds for the day – The White-headed Pigeon.

Rainbow Lorikeet,  Karbeethong, Victoria, 20 Dec 2016

Rainbow Lorikeets, Karbeethong

Rainbow Lorikeet,  Karbeethong, Victoria, 20 Dec 2016

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Rainbow Lorikeet,  Karbeethong, Victoria, 20 Dec 2016

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White-headed Pigeon, Karbeethong, Victoria, 20 Dec 2016

White-headed Pigeon, Adobe Mudbrick Flats

Rowdy Rainbow Lorikeets

After leaving the car in the Boundary Road carpark at Braeside Park, I could hear quite a few parrots in one of the nearby trees. A great cacophony of squabbling and screeching. The group of four below seemed to be  investigating the tree hollow. I couldn’t tell why – maybe disputing over a potential nest site or food source. They were interesting to watch and photograph as they chewed and tested the dead wood of the hollow. They all seemed to be adults and none were demanding food.  Many more were in the branches above watching and preening.

Rainbow Lorikeets, Braeside Park, Victoria, 3 Jan 2017

Rainbow Lorikeets, Braeside Park, Victoria

Rainbow Lorikeets, Braeside Park, Victoria, 3 Jan 2017

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Rainbow Lorikeets, Braeside Park, Victoria, 3 Jan 2017

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The Muskies are coming…

When the Eucalypts start flowering in summer the Musk Lorikeets start arriving in good numbers along Elster Creek and in the trees at Elsternwick Lake. Lorikeets are highly mobile and will follow flowering eucalypts all over the state.  The muskies have a distinctly different call to the locally common Rainbow Lorikeet.  I walked over to the lake on the weekend with a birding friend and we followed our ears to the red flowering gums. A few of the Muskies were low enough to photograph, most shots were of their typical pose – upside down and head into a flower.

Scientifically known as Glossopsitta concinna meaning “elegant tongue parrot” – due to the way it feeds on pollen and nectar rich flowers.

Musk Lorikeet, Elsternwick Park, Elsternwick, Vict, 3 Dec 2016

Musk Lorikeet, Elsternwick Park, Elsternwick

Musk Lorikeet, Elsternwick Park, Elsternwick, Vict, 3 Dec 2016

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Musk Lorikeet, Elsternwick Park, Elsternwick, Vict, 3 Dec 2016

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Musk Lorikeet, Elsternwick Park, Elsternwick, Vict, 3 Dec 2016

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Musk Lorikeet, Elsternwick Park, Elsternwick, Vict, 3 Dec 2016

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Musk Lorikeet, Elsternwick Park, Elsternwick, Vict, 3 Dec 2016

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Musk Lorikeet, Elsternwick Park, Elsternwick, Vict, 3 Dec 2016

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Curious Rainbows

While visiting Braeside Park on the weekend I was photographing a nesting Tawny Frogmouth, and two Rainbow Lorrikeets decided to investigate.

Rainbow Lorikeet Braeside Park, Braeside, Victoria

Rainbow Lorikeet Braeside Park, Braeside, Victoria

Rainbow Lorikeet Braeside Park, Braeside, Victoria

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Rainbow Lorikeet Braeside Park, Braeside, Victoria

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Rainbow Lorikeet Braeside Park, Braeside, Victoria

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Rainbow Lorikeet Braeside Park, Braeside, Victoria

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Rainbow Lorikeet Braeside Park, Braeside, Victoria

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Meeting the new Neighbours

I have been hearing Black-Faced Cuckoo Shrikes for a few weeks now and seen them flying over Elster Creek and along my street with what seemed to be mouthfuls of food. Last night I finally found, a few hundred meters down the road, their nesting/roosting area, a juvenile and its parents. A return visit this evening and I found two juveniles and short while later two parents turned up with the evening meals. This is not a very common bird for the inner suburbs – it is much more common in the drier country to the north. While I was photographing the Cuckoo Shrikes a new neighbour drove up and started to chat about what I was doing (nearly getting run over by the cars coming home from work). As it turned out Mady has a pet Rainbow Lorikeet called Arcus (Latin for Rainbow). She brought her out and I took a few photos (after Arcus took a climb around my neck and shoulders and bit my finger)

Black Faced Cuckoo Shrike chicks, Elster Creek

Black Faced Cuckoo Shrike chick waiting patiently for a parent to bring a meal

Black Faced Cuckoo Shrike chicks, Elster Creek

Juvenile Black Faced Cuckoo Shrikes

Black Faced Cuckoo Shrike chicks, Elster Creek

A bit of a stretch of the wings while waiting

Black Faced Cuckoo Shrike, Elster Creek, Elwood

A meal finally brought in after a few hours of waiting…

Mady and Arcus, Spray St, Elwood

Mady and Arcus – both new to the area…

Mady and Arcus, Spray St, Elwood

Arcus likes to get into places like eyes, mouth and nostrils…

Mady and Arcus, Spray St, Elwood

Mady and Arcus III

Mady and Arcus, Spray St, Elwood

Mady and Arcus IV

Mady and Arcus, Spray St, Elwood

Arcus seemed curious when Mady’s hair blew around…

Elster Creek Evening Colour

Walking along the local creek last night I stopped to watch a few ducks in the water when a raucous burst of Rainbow Lorikeet sounds from above redirected my attention. Dangling and swinging above me from the end of bent palm tree fronds were two Lorikeets playing and hanging upside down. The competition seemed to be about who could stayed upside down the longest while screeching at each other and me… A number of others watched the action from a nearby power line.

Rainbow Lorikeet, Elster creek

Rainbow Lorikeet playing around

Rainbow Lorikeet, Elster creek

The winner

Rainbow Lorikeet, Elster creek

a bit of story telling…

Rainbow Lorikeet, Elster creek

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Winter to Spring along Elster Creek

With only a few days to go until Spring officially starts, the local trees and Ducks are right on schedule. A late afternoon walk along Elster Creek to see what was about started with trying to find the Lorikeets I could hear in the flowering tree that hangs over the fence in my backyard into the creek. The Rainbow Lorikeets were feeding on the small white flowers and seemed to be enjoying the sun. They allowed me to get quite close before they flew onto the next flowering tree.

Rainbow Lorikeet, Elster Creek, Elwood

Rainbow Lorikeet, Elster Creek, Elwood

Rainbow Lorikeet, Elster Creek, Elwood

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Rainbow Lorikeet, Elster Creek, Elwood

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Rainbow Lorikeet, Elster Creek, Elwood

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Rainbow Lorikeet, Elster Creek, Elwood

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Rainbow Lorikeet, Elster Creek, Elwood

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Rainbow Lorikeet, Elster Creek, Elwood

VII

At the local wetlands lake I ran into a birding friend Gio, and we walked along the banks together planning our next day trip into the bush. We came across  a family of Wood Ducks that had nested nearby and were now raising 10 checks. Wood Ducks have quite large families and I think it is needed as quite a few chicks are taken by many predators. Wood Ducks are usually pretty calm around people and just wander back to the water if you approach but these adults were much more nervous of us and took to the water straight away.

Wood Duck and Chicks, Elster Creek, Elwood

Female Wood Duck and Chicks, Elster Creek

Wood Duck and Chicks, Elster Creek, Elwood

Is the male Wood Duck sticking his tongue out at me?