Tag Archives: Braeside Park

Old Faithful…

Recently I stopped by Braeside Park to look for the reported Long Toed Stint, a tiny, rare, migratory shorebird.  It was fairly easy to find with the help of other birders all  lined up with their scopes looking for it as well. Eventually we found it working the mudflat on the main lagoon with a few Sharp-tailed sandpipers, a Pectoral sandpiper (another rare shorebird) and a bunch of Red-kneed dotterells. The Stint became my 350th Lifer and 348th Vic Tick.

On the way back to my car I checked the car park area looking for the pair of Tawny Frogmouths that can usually be found in the trees around the cars. I found them on a low branch taking a bit of late afternoon sunshine. Always a favourite find in any location and a nice way to finish the successful twitch.

Tawny Frogmouth, Braeside Park, Vic

Tawny Frogmouth, practicing its “just a branch, nothing to see here” pose,

They are here somewhere…

When I visit Braeside Park I always look in a few key spots for one of my favourite birds – the Tawny Frogmouth. Around the carpark there is open area and plenty of medium sized trees that the frogmouths like to roost in during the day. They can be hard to find due to the habit of staying very still and elongating their body to look like a dead branch stump. I have been seeing a pair in the carpark for the last 5 years so knew they were here somewhere. It was hot and I was standing in small grove of Wattles in the shade while I was trying to figure out where the pair could be when I looked straight into the eyes of a frogmouth. I found 2 roosting at head height in front of me and when I turned around to move away so I wouldnt be so close I found another. These were the grown chicks from the pair that I usually see in this area. ( I photographed a parent sitting on the nest last year. )

Tawny Frogmouths, Braeside Park, Victoria 5 Jan 2017

Tawny Frogmouth

Tawny Frogmouths, Braeside Park, Victoria 5 Jan 2017

Tawny Frogmouths

Tawny Frogmouths, Braeside Park, Victoria 5 Jan 2017

In the action no-action pose

Tawny Frogmouths, Braeside Park, Victoria 5 Jan 2017

Blending right in

Tawny Frogmouths, Braeside Park, Victoria 5 Jan 2017

The 3rd frogmouth and I would guess a parent as it just ignored me as I almost stumbled into it at head height while moving away from the other two – the breeding pair in this area of the Park are used to people and their cars.

Rowdy Rainbow Lorikeets

After leaving the car in the Boundary Road carpark at Braeside Park, I could hear quite a few parrots in one of the nearby trees. A great cacophony of squabbling and screeching. The group of four below seemed to be  investigating the tree hollow. I couldn’t tell why – maybe disputing over a potential nest site or food source. They were interesting to watch and photograph as they chewed and tested the dead wood of the hollow. They all seemed to be adults and none were demanding food.  Many more were in the branches above watching and preening.

Rainbow Lorikeets, Braeside Park, Victoria, 3 Jan 2017

Rainbow Lorikeets, Braeside Park, Victoria

Rainbow Lorikeets, Braeside Park, Victoria, 3 Jan 2017

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Rainbow Lorikeets, Braeside Park, Victoria, 3 Jan 2017

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Braeside Birding

On the weekend I went for a walk around Braeside Park. I wanted to see if I could find any of the resident Tawny Frogmouths. I know quite a few of their regular roosting trees but with the breeding season well underway it can be a bit more difficult to find them. I only found one Tawny and it happened to be a large one sitting on a well made nest. The nests I have previously seen have been quite flimsy but this one looked more robust. Along with the Rainbow Lorikeets, and the nesting Tawny Frogmouth, I found a White-faced Heron, a wind-blown Black Shouldered Kite and a Wood Duck that seemed confused by my antics – I was standing on the walking path with my binoculars looking up into the trees looking for Tawny’s. I heard a squawk and just above me was the duck. It must have had a nest in the tree hollow or  it would not have stayed on the branch so close to me…

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Tawny Frogmouth, Braeside Park, Victoria

tawny-frogmouth-braeside-park-braeside-victoria

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white-faced-heron-braeside-park-braeside-victoria

White-faced Heron

black-shouldered-kite-braeside-park-braeside-victoria

Black-shouldered Kite

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australian-wood-duck-braeside-park-braeside-victoria

Australian Wood duck

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trying to figure out what I was doing…

 

Curious Rainbows

While visiting Braeside Park on the weekend I was photographing a nesting Tawny Frogmouth, and two Rainbow Lorrikeets decided to investigate.

Rainbow Lorikeet Braeside Park, Braeside, Victoria

Rainbow Lorikeet Braeside Park, Braeside, Victoria

Rainbow Lorikeet Braeside Park, Braeside, Victoria

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Rainbow Lorikeet Braeside Park, Braeside, Victoria

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Rainbow Lorikeet Braeside Park, Braeside, Victoria

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Rainbow Lorikeet Braeside Park, Braeside, Victoria

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Rainbow Lorikeet Braeside Park, Braeside, Victoria

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Swamp Harriers of Braeside Park

There are several Swamp Harriers at Braeside Park Wetlands. On a recent visit we watched a pair circle the main wetlands in search of dinner. The usual bird alarm went up and gave us a chance to get ready to photograph the Harriers as they flew nearby. Over the wetlands, a single Little Raven kept flying up to harass the Harriers.

Swamp Harrier, Braeside Park, Victoria

Swamp Harrier, Braeside Park, Victoria

Swamp Harrier, Braeside Park, Victoria

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Swamp Harrier, Braeside Park, Victoria

Circling the wetlands searching below for prey

Swamp Harrier, Braeside Park, Victoria

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Swamp Harrier, Braeside Park, Victoria

Identifying white rump markings for a Swamp Harrier 

Swamp Harrier, Braeside Park, Victoria

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Little Raven, Braeside Park, Victoria

Little Raven taking on the raptors

Rainbows and Red-rumps

I walked around Braeside Park last week with a few friends. It has been a while since I have explored this part of the park having spent more time recently looking around the neighbouring Woodlands Industrial Estate wetlands. With all the rain over winter the lagoons have filled up nicely and there is a lot of fresh growth. There was quite the buzz around the park as many parrots, lorikeets and cockatoos searched for and explored every hollow they could looking for suitable nest sites. Once claimed the nest sites are vigorously and noisily defended. The highlight of the day was a large dead tree with a quite a number of hollows that seemed to be occupied by Red-rumped Parrots – a parrot apartment block. While it is still Winter here, one can definitely feel the change coming as the birds move into gear for the new breeding season.

 

Rainbow Lorikeets, Braeside Park, Victoria

Rainbow Lorikeets, Braeside Park, Victoria

Red-rumped Parrots, Braeside Park, Victoria

Female Red-rumped Parrot exploring a hollow

Red-rumped Parrots, Braeside Park, Victoria

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Male Red Rumped Parrot, Braeside Park, Victoria

Male Red Rumped Parro waiting for the female to pop back out with a decision…

Red-rumped Parrots, Braeside Park, Victoria

Red-rumped Parrots – male guarding above and the female enjoying a little sun in the nest hollow below. Her duller colouring is well suited for long stints at the nest