Tag Archives: Galah

More Moorooduc Magic

Moorooduc Quarry is fast becoming one of my favourite places to bird. It is a compact site with a variety of vegetation and landscapes and many bird species.

On the latest visit to check in on the Yellow Robin family I found the Robin now sitting on eggs in the nest.

Brooding Eastern Yellow Robin II, Moorooduc Quarry Flora and Fauna Reserve

Brooding Eastern Yellow Robin.

Brooding Eastern Yellow Robin II, Moorooduc Quarry Flora and Fauna Reserve

Keeping a careful eye on me – I kept my distance

I also found a few regulars and a new one for my site records – a Bassian Thrush – a speckled bird a little larger than a blackbird that loves to forage in the understory of thick cooler forests. While I was trying to photograph the Yellow Robins it popped out to see what the fuss was – posed for a few moments and then dashed back into the thick scrub. I have rarely seen a Bassian Thrush and this is only the second time I have been fast enough to get a photo.

Bassian Thrush, Moorooduc Quarry

Bassian Thrush, Moorooduc Quarry

Bassian Thrush, Moorooduc Quarry

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Grey Butcherbird, Moorooduc Quarry

Grey Butcherbird watching the antics of the Galahs

Galah, Moorooduc Quarry

Female Galah watching the nearby group of male Galahs, Moorooduc Quarry

Galah, Moorooduc Quarry

Male Galah enjoying some dandelion seed heads.

Galah vs Dandelion

Recently on a beautiful sunny Winter’s day, moving around the golf course and trying to avoid the wayward shots of beginner golfers, I came across a pair of galahs feeding on grass seeds along one of the fairway edges. They let me get fairly close and did not move off until a Magpie barged into the pair to investigate their food source – a defenceless dandelion seed head.

Galahs, Elster Creek,

Galahs, Elster Creek,

Galah, Elster Creek

Yum Yum

Galah, Elster Creek

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Galah, Elster Creek

A miffed Galah after a Magpie crashed the dinner table…

Elster Creek in Jan

I had read in a “Friends of Elster Creek” newsletter that a little Grassbird had been seen at the Elster Creek golf course lake. I thought I would try to track it down and see what else was making the lake its home…The Grassbird is a secretive little bird that lives in tall reeds and lake side vegetation. Rarely seen but easily heard with a distinctive call that can be mimicked. I tried calling and it responded by flying over to the nearest reed bed and looking for the potential intruder. I think it was a juvenile as it did not have the strong colouring of an adult and did not make any calls of its own in defence of its new territory.

Little Grassbird

Little Grassbird

Little Grassbird II

Little Grassbird II

Many of the tall gums along the creek and at the golf course are flowering. The trees are full of birds – Rainbow and Musk Lorikeets and Red Wattlebirds. The Musk below took a while to find as I could hear him well (his call is quite different from the local Rainbow Lorikeet) but I could not see him. The Lorikeets are well camouflaged to help protect against predators.

Musk Lorikeet

Musk Lorikeet

 

A bird found in high numbers everywhere. Another gregarious species that can overwhelm a country town with their sheer numbers, noise and appetite. I found these guys digging up roots under large pine trees. Due to their numbers and generally easy going demeanor Galahs are a favourite of many raptors

Galahs

Galahs

Galah II

Galah II

Walking home I found a pair of spotted doves and took a shot of one to try and see the neck feathers a bit better.

Spotted Dove

Spotted Dove