Tag Archives: Crimson Rosella

Shake your tail feathers…

A brightly coloured Crimson Rosella flew down to a low branch next to the track I was walking along at Green’s Bush recently and started to preen. It finished with a vigorous  shake of his tail feathers. It was all over in about 10 seconds and he flew off. I was lucky enough to get off a few quick action shots during the waggle.

Crimson Rosella, Greens Bush, Mornington Peninsula National Park, Vict

Crimson Rosella, Greens Bush, Mornington Peninsula National Park, Vict

Crimson Rosella, Greens Bush, Mornington Peninsula National Park, Vict

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Crimson Rosella, Greens Bush, Mornington Peninsula National Park, Vict

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Crimson Rosella, Greens Bush, Mornington Peninsula National Park, Vict

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Every nook and cranny

While walking around my usual Green’s Bush circuit I noticed many Crimson Rosellas exploring every tree hollow on the older growth Eucalypts. A few went right inside the various cavities after a cursory glance, and several flew off quickly when an occupant was discovered (most likely a brush tailed possum or sugar glider). I found a pair really giving this hollow a thorough inspection. One did all the inspecting while the other stood guard on a nearby branch – he spent the time watching me on the trail and shaking his tail feathers now and again and quietly squawking. I assumed the other took this as a signal to be alert but not alarmed.

Crimson Rosella, Green's Bush, Vict

Crimson Rosella guarding his mate while she explored a potential nest hollow, Green’s Bush, Vict

 

Crimson Rosella, Green's Bush, Vict

Crimson Rosella inspecting the hollow 

Potential nest hole, Green's Bush, Vict

Potential nest hole – looking well used but too small for a possum.

Crimson Rosella, Green's Bush, Vict

I found another Crimson Rosella looking for something in a dead tree. it was very focused and just ignored me as I walked under it. , Green’s Bush, Vict

Black Olives for Crimson Rosellas

Once I harvested as many olives as I could process from our little front yard Olive Grove in Rosebud I left the rest for the birds. Previously I had not noticed many birds  feeding on the olives. This year a number of species have enjoyed the late season fruit. I have seen Sulphur-crested Cockatoos, Little Corellas, Silvereyes and now a pair of Crimson Rosellas. I was packing the back of my car only a few feet away and these guys just ignored me. The fruit is very ripe and starting to shrivel so must be quite edible even with their raw bitter flavour.

I have read that most parrots/cockatoos are left handed. The fellow below was right handed, grabbing and eating the olives using his right foot. It was windy at times and he did very well to hang on and feed at the same time.

Crimson Rosella, Rosebud, Victoria, 30 July 2017

Crimson Rosella, Rosebud, Victoria, 30 July 2017

Crimson Rosella, Rosebud, Victoria, 30 July 2017

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Bath time at Point Addis

After a long rain storm at Point Addis, on the surf coast near Anglesea, I watched the birds come out and make the most of the rain puddles. This little male Superb Fairy Wren was fully focussed on having a good clean. He would spend a minute or so bathing, fly up to a post, preen and then back into the puddle again. Takes a lot of work to keep your feathers in shape.  His female companion was much more nervous and only took a few quick flying dips.

Male Superb Fairy Wren, Pt Addis,

Male Superb Fairy Wren, Pt Addis,

Male Superb Fairy Wren, Pt Addis,

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Male Superb Fairy Wren, Pt Addis,

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Male Superb Fairy Wren, Pt Addis,

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On some scrub nearby an immature Crimson Rosella watched the action. Over time his feathers will slowly turn a vibrant crimson. The mottled colours helps the bird stay camouflaged as they learn the skills required to survive. Unless they are in the open like the one below they can be very hard to see and find in the trees.

Immature Crimson Rosella, Pt Addis

Immature Crimson Rosella, Pt Addis

An example below of the bright colours of the adult Crimson Rosella,  photographed a month back at Welch Track in the Dandenongs.

Crimson Rosella, Welch Track, Dandenongs Ranges National Park

Crimson Rosella, Welch Track, Dandenongs Ranges National Park

Dandenong Ranges National Park – Welch Track: The Powerful Owl

Another part of the Dandenong Ranges that I have explored briefly is a section near one of the Puffing Billy Steam Train Stations – Welch Track. It is a rather steep section of the Park with a good track leading down to a rainforest gully and then merging onto other tracks. I had seen a report of a few Large Billed Scrubwrens in the area and while I looked for them I found a few other interesting birds along the way.

Crimson Rosella

Crimson Rosella

Male Superb Fairy Wren

Male Superb Fairy Wren

Red Browed Treecreeper

Red Browed Treecreeper – usually difficult to see as they stick to the higher canopies of very tall trees

Juvenile Powerful Owl

Juvenile Powerful Owl – still with fledgling white chest feathers, and already with extremely large and lethal talons. The Powerful Owl is able to take much larger and heavier prey – a favourite being the brush tailed possum.

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Even as a young Owl in daylight it had much better senses than I did – it knew when other people were coming down the track well before I did.

Welch Track Foliage and fallen tree

Welch Track Foliage and fallen tree

Central Victoria – Hepburn Springs

During my recent birding trip to Central Victoria, I  dropped off my house mate at the Hepburn Springs Spa so she could take the waters. I decided to stay in the area and explore. I followed the small creek that fed the Spa upstream for an hour or so and found a number of interesting birds. There were many juveniles about still being fed by their parents. The juveniles can be a bit easier to photograph as they have not learnt to fear everything yet. The parents were much shyer and when they noticed that I was taking an interest in their chicks moved the chicks to new locations.

Crimson Rosella

Crimson Rosella – feeding on seed pods while keeping an eye on its fledgeling which seemed quite curious about me.

 

Juvenile Crimson Rosella

Juvenile Crimson Rosella

Juvenile Sacred Kingfisher

Juvenile Sacred Kingfisher

Juvenile Yellow Faced Honeyeater

Juvenile Yellow Faced Honeyeater

And a regular and tough target

Superb Fairy Wren

Superb Fairy Wren