Tag Archives: Red Necked Stint

Flinders Birding Minute (or two)

I drove down to the Flinders Ocean Beach today, also called Mushroom Reef due to the shape of the exposed reef at low tide. It is part of the Mornington Peninsula National Park. It was high tide and I walked along the sand looking for Hooded Plovers and other waders.

 

A birding minute or two at Flinders Ocean Beach

 

Singing Honeyeater, Flinders Ocean Beach, Flinders, Vic

Singing Honeyeater in the strong wind, Flinders Ocean Beach, Flinders, Vic

Singing Honeyeater, Flinders Ocean Beach, Flinders, Vic

II

Singing Honeyeater, Flinders Ocean Beach, Flinders, Vic

III

Flinders Ocean Beach, Flinders, Vic

Flinders Ocean Beach, Flinders, Vic

Flinders Ocean Beach, Flinders, Vic

II

Second Cove, Flinders Ocean Beach, Flinders, Vic

Second Cove, Flinders Ocean Beach

Juvenile Hooded Plover, Flinders Ocean Beach, Flinders, Vic

Juvenile Hooded Plover (without the signature black hood)

Double Banded Plover, Red-necked Stints, Flinders Ocean Beach, Flinders, Vic

Double Banded Plover, Red-necked Stints

Lifer 321

Over Summer the Western Treatment Plant, associated wetlands and conservation ponds are home to many thousands of migratory birds that spend the breeding season in the Northern Hemisphere: Northern China, the tundra of Arctic Siberia and along the eastern Eurasian Arctic. After the breeding season the shorebirds birds migrate down south of the equator and spread out over the Southern Hemisphere including Australia and New Zealand. The return to and introduce first year birds to their favourite feeding grounds. At the Pooh Farm there are thousands of Sharp-tailed Sandpipers and Red-necked Stints, and many Curlew Sandpipers, and a number of Common Greenshanks and Godwits .  Every now and again a rarer species turns up. This year we have had Pectoral Sandpipers, now becoming a regular in low numbers, a few Broad Billed Sandpipers and an exciting visit by a Red-necked Phalarope. A number of regular birders patrol the main shallow lagoons looking for a rare find. It can be difficult as many of the birds look the same, come in a variety of colours and plumage even within a species and may appear as a single slightly different bird amongst thousands.

This Summer I visited with a few neighbourhood birders including Dave, an experienced birder who has specialised in various shorebirds over the years. He managed to spot the Broad-billed Sandpiper, a stint sized species with a long flat bill. On two separate occasions,  amongst thousands of birds,  Dave has managed to find this little bird based on its features and its habit. The Broad-billed Sandpiper became my  321st Lifer and my 318th State Tick.

Broad Billed Sandpiper, Western Treatment Plant

Broad-billed Sandpiper, Western Treatment Plant

Curlew Sandpiper, Western Treatment Plant

Curlew Sandpiper, Western Treatment Plant

Mixed Sandpiper stint flock, Western Treatment Plant

Mixed flock of Sharp-tailed Sandpipers, Curlew Sandpipers and Red-necked Stints.  Western Treatment Plant

The Lonsdale Lakes of Bellarine

Over Easter I explored the Bellarine Peninsula, south of Melbourne and the  other side of the opening of Port Phillip Bay. I have not been down this way before for photography and birding so it was all new. I researched some tips from John (my birding mate) and hit a few sites over several days.

The first area was the Lonsdale Lakes starting at Lake Victoria. It is a flat area with wide mud banks and a fairly shallow lagoon. It is quickly drying out but obviously still has a good food supply for the various species I came across: Swans, Stilts, Red Necked Stints, Red Capped Plovers, White Faced Herons and Gulls.

The vegetation long the lake side and paths is low scrub, shrubs, grasses and salt -bush and various succulent type plants -all very tough and hardy for dry, salty and windy conditions. It is quite attractive in the right light too with many shades of green…

Lake side vegetation

The path along the lake’s edge

Lake side vegetation

Lake side vegetation

 Red Capped Plover

Red Capped Plover – a tiny young bird in a wide expanse, well camouflaged when hiding beside a small rock

 Red Capped Plover

Red Capped Plover

 Red Capped Plover

Red Capped Plover II

 Red Capped Plover

Red Capped Plovers

 Red Capped Plover

Red Capped Plover III

Red Necked Stints

Red Necked Stints flying in

Swan

Many Black Swans were feeding in the shallow water and flying over to fresh feeding grounds

I watched this White Faced Heron for a while and took a few shots as it fed in the mud along a nearby creek. At one point it stood quite still, did a full body shake and then went back to feeding. It might be part of a grooming action or just bringing in more air under its feathers as the day got later and cooler.

White faced Heron

White faced Heron

White faced Heron

White faced Heron II

White faced Heron

White faced Heron III

White faced Heron

White faced Heron IV

The real Point Cook.

Until I went to have a look at the Cheetham Wetlands in Altona Meadows I never knew that there was actually a geographical landmark of Point Cook. I thought it was just an outer fringe suburb of South Western Melbourne.

There is an old homestead and cafe nearby and an easy to reach carpark. There is a path straight down to the beach and a short walk along the beach to Point Cook. Another path from the carpark meanders through the grass fields to the wetlands observation tower.

The Actual Point Cook

The Actual Point Cook

A quick visit to the Point at high tide produced quite a few shorebirds feeding along the edge or preening and resting on the rocks.

Red Necked Stints

Red Necked Stints

Red Necked Stints II

Red Necked Stints II

Red Necked Stint

Red Necked Stint

Crested Terns

Crested Terns

Crested Tern II

Crested Tern II – on processing I noticed the tern wore a silver band on his right leg

Crested Terns and Curlew Sandpipers

Crested Terns and Curlew Sandpipers

Melbourne CBD Skline from Pt Cook beach

Melbourne CBD skyline from Pt Cook beach

A walk along the beach and then following a vehicle track brought us to the tower with views of the city and over the wetlands. At this time of year (late Summer) the wetlands are quickly drying out. I assume that the creek below the tower is being fed by the suburban street runoff from recent rains.

Cheetham Wetlands Observation Tower

Cheetham Wetlands Observation Tower – through the heat haze

Cheetham Wetlands Observation Tower II - an interesting design - fanciest bird hide I have ever been to...

Cheetham Wetlands Observation Tower II – an interesting design – fanciest bird hide I have ever been to…

Cheetham Wetlands Observation Tower III

Cheetham Wetlands Observation Tower III

Cheetham Wetlands  Observation Tower old nest

Cheetham Wetlands Observation Tower with an old nest

Cheetham Wetlands from Observation Tower

Cheetham Wetlands from Observation Tower

Cheetham Wetlands from Observation Tower II

Cheetham Wetlands from Observation Tower II

Cheetham Wetlands from Observation Tower III

Cheetham Wetlands from Observation Tower III