Tag Archives: Flinders Ocean Beach

Flinders Birding Minute (or two)

I drove down to the Flinders Ocean Beach today, also called Mushroom Reef due to the shape of the exposed reef at low tide. It is part of the Mornington Peninsula National Park. It was high tide and I walked along the sand looking for Hooded Plovers and other waders.

 

A birding minute or two at Flinders Ocean Beach

 

Singing Honeyeater, Flinders Ocean Beach, Flinders, Vic

Singing Honeyeater in the strong wind, Flinders Ocean Beach, Flinders, Vic

Singing Honeyeater, Flinders Ocean Beach, Flinders, Vic

II

Singing Honeyeater, Flinders Ocean Beach, Flinders, Vic

III

Flinders Ocean Beach, Flinders, Vic

Flinders Ocean Beach, Flinders, Vic

Flinders Ocean Beach, Flinders, Vic

II

Second Cove, Flinders Ocean Beach, Flinders, Vic

Second Cove, Flinders Ocean Beach

Juvenile Hooded Plover, Flinders Ocean Beach, Flinders, Vic

Juvenile Hooded Plover (without the signature black hood)

Double Banded Plover, Red-necked Stints, Flinders Ocean Beach, Flinders, Vic

Double Banded Plover, Red-necked Stints

Flinders Ocean Beach Part 2 (aka the Crazy Fishermen)

As a follow up to my high tide visit to the Flinders Ocean Beach. My second visit to Flinders was at low tide. There were many more people around, exploring the rock pools, walking on the beach and fishing off the exposed reef. I found the Hooded Plover again further along the beach where piles of seaweed and kelp had washed up. There was no sign of the juvenile Hooded Plover and I hope he was hiding up in the grasses on the sand dunes away from all the activity.  A few more bird species were around at low tide.

The area looked incredibly different at low tide. The mushroom shape of Mushroom Reef was exposed. At high tide the waves can come right up to the wooded steps.

Mushroom Reef Marine Sanctuary - at low tide. At high tide the water comes up to the wooded steps

Mushroom Reef Marine Sanctuary – at low tide. At high tide the water comes up to the wooden steps

White Ibis feeding in the grasses along the beach edge

White Ibis feeding in the grasses along the beach edge – there was something they really liked as they just munched away on whatever was living in the grass.

Sooty Oystercatchers and a Little Pied Cormorant

Sooty Oystercatchers and a Little Pied Cormorant – one of the Oystercatchers was Banded (yellow and silver rings)

Hooded Plover

Hooded Plover

I noticed that one of the Plovers was banded. Their is an extensive banding program to monitor the Plovers across Southern Australia

I noticed that one of the Plovers was banded. There is an extensive banding program to monitor the Plovers across Southern Australia

Hooded Plover pair

Hooded Plover pair

Keeping low into the wind and catching anything that the waves bring in..

Keeping low into the wind and catching anything that the waves bring in..

Hooded Plover - keeping low and facing into a string wind

Hooded Plover – keeping low and facing into a strong wind

I was surprised to see blokes fishing way out on the last set of rocks at the edge of the reef. The waves were getting bigger and starting to crash near them and we have had bad weather and ocean warnings all week. They were at least packing up as I watched them and took some pics.

Crazy Fishermen

Crazy Fishermen

Flinders Ocean Beach Part 1

When I go to Greens Bush I like to drop in on Flinders back beach as well. There is a pair of resident Hooded Plovers on the beach that are surviving the conditions and the number of people that visit. It is a popular area, with the golf course above and the easy access to the beach at several points for locals and visitors. It is probably the closest point to Melbourne to find the Sooty Oystercatcher, the Hooded Plover and a good chance for the Black Faced Cormorant (though I have not seen them there yet).  I visited twice on the weekend, once at high tide and again at low tide. At high tide the birds rest and groom at the high water mark waiting for the tide to turn and occasionally run into the waters edge for anything juicy that may become exposed or washed up.

Crested Tern & Silver Gull

Crested Tern & Silver Gull

Crested Tern

Crested Tern

The Hooded Plover is a closely monitored bird. It is endangered in many areas along the Australian coastline due to housing and commercial development and land clearing.  It is particularly vulnerable to beach users especially dog owners. It lives and hunts on the sand and nests in scrapes amongst the sea weed at the high water mark or at the base of the dunes. It is hunted by cats, foxes and other predators and the nests are often disturbed or destroyed by walkers and dogs. Some councils will rope off areas when Plovers are nesting but so far I have only seen the Mallacoota council do this at Betka Beach. (On a busy day people did seem to stay clear of the ropes and the signs.) It is too bad that other councils don’t try it as well.

Hooded Plover

Hooded Plover

Hooded Plover II

Hooded Plover II – hunkered down against the wind with plumage that helps camouflage against predators.

Hooded Plover III

Hooded Plover III

Associating closely with the Hooded Plover was a Double Banded Plover. Due to its size I had thought it was a Juvenile Hooded Plover but I am happy to be corrected.

Juvenile Hooded Plover

To Flinders Ocean Beach Part 2