Compass Tour of Victoria

Over the Xmas break I planned and completed a compass tour of Victoria. It covered Mallacoota and various other spots in the far east of the state, the North East/Central covering the Grampians, Little Desert and Wyperfeld National Park, the far West including Nelson and the The Lower Glenelg National Park as well as a few spots on the way home, and finally the South – Mornington Peninsula. I am finally back at work – resting from all the driving, mozzie bites (and three ticks), early starts and the heat of the desert country. I am already thinking about the end of year trip and what new spots I can discover or visit.

Below are a few photos of the Cabbage Tree Palms from the Cabbage Tree Creek area, located along the Princes Highway on the way to Mallacoota – The Cabbage Tree Palm is Victoria’s only native palm species and are found in a few locations. The picnic ground has a lovely short rainforest walk with many bird and animal species. I saw my first lifer (lifer = first time seeing a bird species) of the trip –  a TopKnot Pigeon.

The Topknot Pigeons are often found in this reserve feeding on the fruit of the palm. I saw a flock of around 10 flying across the reserve – they are a very nervous species and will flush and fly off even when I was quite far away. I will have to try for photos the next time I head to Mallacoota.

Cabbage Tree Palm, Cabbage Tree Creek

Cabbage Tree Palm, Cabbage Tree Creek

I did find a curious family of Brown Gerygone along the walk and spent some time photographing them. A tiny bird the size of a thornbill with a melodic song. I managed to see all three main Victorian species in 2015 – Brown, Western and White Throated.

Brown Gerygone, Cabbage Tree Creek

Brown Gerygone, Cabbage Tree Creek

Brown Gerygone, Cabbage Tree Creek

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Brown Gerygone, Cabbage Tree Creek

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Brown Gerygone, Cabbage Tree Creek

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Brown Gerygone, Cabbage Tree Creek

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2 responses to “Compass Tour of Victoria

  1. Pingback: Looking for desert rarities | The Gap Year and Beyond

  2. Pingback: A bright red cap | The Gap Year and Beyond

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