Tag Archives: Swamp Wallaby

Serendip Sanctuary

Serendip Sanctuary at the base of the You Yangs, South-West of Melbourne,  is a good place to practice your bird and animal photography. I like to visit the sanctuary a few times a year and see what wild birds have turned up. The Bush Stone Curlew and the Scarlet chested Parrot were in a walk through aviary along with many other species that are quite used to people. The Bush Stone Curlew uses it stillness and camouflaged plumage and freezes when threatened or nervous. While walking through the aviary we had to wait for the bird to stop freezing and move out of the way. It had to be hunting insects as it did not have to walk on the track we were on. The Scarlet-chested Parrot is rare in Victoria and usually found in inland Australia. The Magpie Geese are actually wild and are often found at Serendip especially when the water levels are higher. They are not the prettiest bird around – remind me more of a vulture than goose. Apparently they are very good eating in Northern Territory.

Bush Stone Curlew, Serendip Sanctuary, Lara, Victoria

Bush Stone Curlew, Serendip Sanctuary, Lara, Victoria

Bush Stone Curlew, Serendip Sanctuary, Lara, Victoria

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Bush Stone Curlew, Serendip Sanctuary, Lara, Victoria

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Scarlet chested Parrot, Serendip Sanctuary, Lara, Victoria

Scarlet chested Parrot

Scarlet chested Parrot, Serendip Sanctuary, Lara, Victoria

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Swamp Wallaby, Serendip Sanctuary, Lara, Victoria

Swamp Wallaby

Magpie Goose, Serendip Sanctuary, Lara, Victoria

Magpie Goose, Serendip Sanctuary, Lara, Victoria

Magpie Goose, Serendip Sanctuary, Lara, Victoria

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Magpie Goose, Serendip Sanctuary, Lara, Victoria

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Stinkers in the garden

For some reason Wallabies don’t seem to panic as easily as Grey Kangaroos. They can be quite approachable particular in areas where they have become accustomed to people walking around. As long as you don’t cut off their escape paths they are happy to keep eating and just keep an eye on you. We recently saw a few Black or Swamp Wallabies at Cranbourne Botanical Gardens – woodlands area. They are usually on their own or with a joey.  We were able to take a few shots and slowly creep forward before they ambled off. They have nice colouring especially in late afternoon sun light. The Grey Kangaroos were much more flighty and generally took off as soon as they saw us.
According to Wiki, the swamp wallaby (Wallabia bicolor)  has some unusual names that I have not heard of before including black-tailed wallaby, fern wallaby, black pademelon, stinker (in Queensland), and black stinker (in New South Wales) due to its characteristic swampy odour (which we did not smell on this occasion but now I am curious).
Black Wallaby, Cranbourne Botanical Gardens

Black Wallaby, Cranbourne Botanical Gardens

Black Wallaby, Cranbourne Botanical Gardens

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Black Wallaby, Cranbourne Botanical Gardens

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Black Wallaby, Cranbourne Botanical Gardens

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Black Wallaby, Cranbourne Botanical Gardens

Black Wallaby also called a Swamp Wallaby