Tag Archives: Common Bronzewing

Not so Common Bronzewing

I have recently extended my usual circuit around Greens Bush in the Mornington Peninsula National Park to include several of the fire trails that occur further along the Two Bays Walk. On Saturday I took the longer circuit. Where the fire trail came back into the forest my eyes were adapting to the change in light when I disturbed a plump bird a few metres in front of me and with an explosion of clattering wings he flew to a tree above. He didn’t fly far and I had good views of a bird I had not seen before at Greens Bush. A male Common Bronzewing (the large pale head marking denotes a male Bronze)

Common Bronzewing, Greens Bush, Mornington Peninsula National Park, Vic,

Common Bronzewing, Greens Bush, Mornington Peninsula National Park, Vic,

Common Bronzewing, Greens Bush, Mornington Peninsula National Park, Vic,

II

Multi-tasking with a Snake-Bird

I love it when I can do several things at once. I feel a sense of achievement when I accomplish the goal for the day and feel even better when I can do two things for the journey of one. Bunnings is a hardware super store (for those that are not familiar with Australian Hardware Super-stores). I often make a Bunnings run to procure equipment and supplies for my gardens, home projects and camping trips. Opposite my favourite store is Karkarook Park. I stopped in last week to look for photo opportunities before I visited Bunnings. The Park is a restored sand mine and now has a wetlands area made up of several well vegetated lagoons, a large lake used for canoeing and fishing and pockets of woodlands around the edge.  It has a very good range of water and woodlands birds and I often get up to 50 species on an extended visit. It is close enough to home to just pop in for half an hour and look for a species to photograph

Little Pied Cormorant

Little Pied Cormorant

Common Bronzewing

Common Bronzewing

Male Common Bronzewing

Male Common Bronzewing

Superb Fairy Wren

Male Superb Fairy Wren – immature Fairy-Wren coming into his adult colours

Superb Fairy Wren

Superb Fairy Wren

Masked Lapwing

Masked Lapwing – previously known as a Spur Winged Plover. It can be a very aggressive bird often taking on Raptors (and people) if they get too close to feeding grounds or nests. They make their various alarm calls quite casually, spooking other nearby birds. The Lapwing can be difficult to get close to….

Australasian Darter

Australasian Darter – a young female, the males are generally all black. This one allowed me to approach slowly along the pier until I was quite close.

Australasian Darter

Australasian Darter – they are also called a snake bird due to their swimming habit (very low in the water and sliding backwards into the water to hunt) and their very long snake like neck. This one waved it around quite a bit keeping an eye on fish below, hunters above and me…

Australasian Darter

III

Australasian Darter

IV

Australasian Darter

V

Australasian Darter

Interesting eye and bill detail

Australasian Darter

When the Lapwing nearby gave one  of its alarm calls the Darter immediately looked up for danger. She did not fly off or panic but was very aware. It is interesting that birds know each others specific danger calls

Australasian Darter

Beautiful wing patterns

Up the You Yang(s)

Halfway between Melbourne and Geelong is a Regional Park with high granite peaks and over 50km of Mountain Bike riding trails. It is also a good spot to bush walk and find a reasonable selection of uncommon woodlands birds. It can be dry and hot at times and there are a few dams in the park near the entrance that usually have water and so are good spots to explore for birds. There is a 12 km dirt road (the Great Circle Drive) that winds around the park taking in most of the main habitats.

Injured Cockatiel

Injured Cockatiel on the side of the road leading to the You Yangs, not known in this area so I assume an aviary escapee.

Scarlet Robin

Scarlet Robin – teased me into thick scrub to try and take a photo. A curious bird and one that stands out quite well against the grey/brown background of the surrounding bush.

There are several large groups of White Winged Choughs (chuffs) in the You Yangs. They are a social species living in extended family groups. They are generally hard to sneak up on as they post guards in the surrounding trees as the main group feeds on the ground. I took some time and watched this family and slowly moved closer. They have very distinctive calls and different alarms for a variety of threats.

White Winged Chough

White Winged Chough

White Winged Chough

White Winged Chough  – one of the guards keeping an eye on me as the main group looked for food on the ground.

White Winged Chough

White Winged Chough III

White Winged Chough

White Winged Chough – a glimpse of the White Wings – very clear in flight and when grooming

White Winged Chough

The two above were grooming each other and cleaning their own feathers. 

Common Bronzewing

Common Bronzewing

Common Bronzewing

Common Bronzewing II

Moorooduc Quarry Flora and Fauna Reserve, Mt Eliza

Along the Moorooduc Highway that heads down to the Mornington Peninsula is the Mt Eliza Regional Park. A section of this park is called the Moorooduc Flora and Fauna Reserve. It  is the site of an old (1887) stone and ballast quarry used for the railway sleeper beds for the Baxter to Mornington railway connection. The quarry is now flooded and has been converted to a Flora and Fauna Reserve and is particularly good for birds. The quarry is actually fenced off due to dangerous cliffs and rockfalls but holes in the fence have been created by locals wishing to access the water and quarry site. When I was there last week locals were walking dogs and fishing in the quarry. The high cliffs provide good nest sites for Peregrine Falcons to nest. Over the last few years I have seen several fledgelings learning to fly and hunt.

Old Moorooduc Quarry

Old Moorooduc Quarry

Old Moorooduc Quarry II

Old Moorooduc Quarry II

Walking from the carpark to the quarry I noticed a number of new fledglings being attended to by their parents.

Juvenile Dusky Woodswallow

Juvenile Dusky Woodswallow

Juvenile Dusky Woodswallow II

Juvenile Dusky Woodswallow II – demanding food from a parent nearby

Juvenile Dusky Woodswallow III

Juvenile Dusky Woodswallow III

Dusky Woodswallow

Dusky Woodswallow

Young Grey Fantail

Young Grey Fantail – how could you not respond to those eyes?

Striated Thornbill

Striated Thornbill

Striated Thornbill II

Striated Thornbill II

Striated Thornbill III

Striated Thornbill III

Striated Thornbill IV

Striated Thornbill IV

Striated Thornbill V

Striated Thornbill V

Striated Thornbill VI

Striated Thornbill VI

Common Bronzewing

Common Bronzewing

Common Bronzewing II

Common Bronzewing II

Eastern Yellow Robin - what you looking at?

Eastern Yellow Robin – what you looking at?

Eastern Yellow Robin II

Eastern Yellow Robin II

Flowering Water Lillies

Flowering Water Lillies in Moorooduc Quarry