Tag Archives: Blue Billed Duck

Enjoying Jawbone photography

With an abundance of birds that are fairly used to people, Jawbone Flora and Fauna Reserve along the Williamstown coastline is a good place to practice bird photography.

Australian Magpie, Jawbone Flora and Fauna Reserve, Williamstown, Vic

Australian Magpie, Jawbone Flora and Fauna Reserve, Williamstown, Vic

New Holland Honeyeater, Jawbone Flora and Fauna Reserve, Williamstown, Vic

New Holland Honeyeater

New Holland Honeyeater, Jawbone Flora and Fauna Reserve, Williamstown, Vic

II

Hoary-headed Grebe, Jawbone Flora and Fauna Reserve, Williamstown, Vic

Hoary-headed Grebe

Crested Pigeons, Jawbone Flora and Fauna Reserve, Williamstown, Vic

Crested Pigeons feeling the early morning cold

Blue-billed Duck, Jawbone Flora and Fauna Reserve, Williamstown, Vic

Blue-billed Duck

Jawbone Flora and Fauna Reserve, Williamstown

Jawbone  Reserve is an easy to reach Marine and Park reserve along the shoreline of Williamstown. It has many water and heathland birds and a good list of 50+ species can be gathered in a few hours. Some of the bird visitors are seasonal but most are there all year round. It is an excellent site for beginners (birders and photographers) as the birds are generally used to the passing traffic and will ignore anyone on the paths. If you walk along the edge and stop and use a camera or binoculars they can get a bit edgy and some species will fly off or move away. Careful observations (and quiet calm movement) will result in rewarding sightings and photos. At low tide the outer lagoon drops right down exposing sand and mud bars and thousands of waders can cover the area. A birding scope is needed to get clearer views further out.

Jawbone Flora and Fauna Reserve, Williamstown, Vic -  looking west towards Altona

Jawbone Flora and Fauna Reserve, Williamstown, Vic – looking west towards Altona

Jawbone Flora and Fauna Reserve, Williamstown, Vic - looking out into the Bay across the lagoons and tidal flats.

Jawbone Flora and Fauna Reserve, Williamstown, Vic – looking out into the Bay across the lagoons and tidal flats.

Sharp tailed Sandpiper

Sharp tailed Sandpiper

3 Shags on a Rock - Little Black, Little Pied and Pied Cormorants

3 Shags on a Rock – Little Black, Little Pied and Pied Cormorants

Mid Day Siesta - Swans, Stilts & Cormorant

Mid Day Siesta – Swans, Stilts & Cormorant

Royal Spoonbill

Royal Spoonbill

Blue Billed Duck

Blue Billed Duck – one of only a few true diving ducks amongst Australian duck species.

Blue Billed Duck - male with Blue Bill and the female. The female Blue Billed can often be mistaken for the rarer and endangered  Freckled duck.

Blue Billed Ducks – male with Blue Bill and the female. The female Blue Billed can often be mistaken for the rarer and endangered Freckled duck.

Great Crested Grebe

Great Crested Grebe

Black Winged Stilts - well named

Black Winged Stilts – well named. In the strong wind they did have a little difficulty in maintaining their balance. When scared or flying they make a sound like a small barking dog.

During high tide at Jawbone many of the water birds move onto the sheltered lagoons including hundreds of Swans. When I visited this last week, there were a number of swans with neck tags. Previously I have researched what the tagging meant. If you see a swan you can go to the http://www.myswan.org.au site and log the bird. It is part of a study and research program. Once you log the swan via its tag you can get a bit of a history of it and where it has been. I once asked a researcher about the tag as I thought it might be a bit cruel but was advised that it does not bother the swan and is actually quite loose. The swan’s neck is quite thin and half of it’s width is actually feathers so the tag fits well. I logged the swans below.

Black Swan P45

Black Swan P45

Black Swan S75

Black Swan S75

Black Swan R47

Black Swan R47

Black Swan R45

Black Swan R45

Black Swan F09

Black Swan F09

Chestnut Teal

Chestnut Teal